Description: When you have reached that point in your turning, where you are ready to challenge yourself with something new, this class will teach you some proven techniques for turning simple hollow forms. Students will have the opportunity to use a variety of turning tools and hollowing tools. You will also learn sharpening techniques for these tools. We will also discuss design options and aesthetics, and learn various finishing techniques. All students are encouraged to bring their favorite turning tools to use on this project.


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As far as schools, there are lots of fine schools that teach woodworking, and I think that they are a good way to get started. However, the best way to learn the trade, in my opinion, is by working alongside an experienced woodworker in a working shop. You’ll learn a lot of valuable skills in a school, but in a shop you’ll learn those skills in more of a practical and real-world surrounding. You have to not only do good work, but do it efficiently, and schools can be a little less demanding than a working shop.

​Luckily, we have also managed to find a detailed video tutorial of the Barn door project that illustrates the process of building a Barn door of your own. The steps and instructions in the video tutorial are different from the source links listed above. Actually, you can make different types of designs for your Barn door depending on which one you can afford easily and DIY on your own.
Now install the vertical stiles. Hold each stile against the front edge of the bookcase sides, then transfer the biscuit­slot locations from the sides onto the stile. Cut slots using the biscuit joiner, apply glue to both surfaces, insert biscuits into the slots and press the stile home. Use a rubber mallet to tap it tight. Repeat the glue-and-­biscuit routine to attach the horizontal mahogany aprons to the shelves. Prior to installation, I routed a decorative profile along the bottom edge of each apron to create shadow lines that accentuate the shelves. The aprons are more than decorative, though. They stiffen the shelf to prevent sagging. Trim the top of the bookcase with crown molding [ 8 ] and the bottom with base molding [ 9 ]. Wait 8 to 10 hours for the glue to cure before filling the shelves.
You could also go old school and use a combination of hand planes. Hand planes of course are much less expensive than a big power tool like a planer, but their drawback is they require a lot of skill, practice, and patience to achieve good results. If you’ve got the time, there’s absolutely no substitute for learning how to hand plane, and you’ll quickly earn the respect of your fellow woodworkers.
Build a model boat. Model boats are a bit tricky to shape and it's best to find individual patterns for these, depending on the type of boat you're after. A very basic one can be made from a rectangular block of wood with a dowel hole drilled in the center, a dowel inserted for the sail pole and a sail (cloth or paper) attached to the dowel pole. It's not the most elegant but it's quick and simple, and from there, you can start building more advanced versions.

This bookcase lets you have plenty of storage for your books, without you having to show it openly. With a locking system, light mechanisms and a lot of built in shelves, this design form maybe the most high tech of all the others we have discussed. Many interesting features such as a folding door, leading to another area of the house, which a guest may never know- completely steal the show!
This hand held sander is a great finish sander. When sanding, grain directions should be the first thing one looks at when deciding which direction to move the sand paper. With the random orbital sander, because of its circular movements, one does not need to take too much notice in the grain direction. Plus, with a velcro pad, switching sandpaper discs only takes a few seconds. Most sanders allow for speed control as well. This is an important feature because you do not want to over or under sand your work since what you leave behind after you finish sanding is going to exist.
Clamp two opposing case sides edge-to-edge and mark each dado location with a pencil. Be sure and mark the location of the case tops far enough down on the case sides, so that the tops provide a joining surface for the valance. Next, clamp a straightedge guide across the two sides. Position the guide square with the plywood edge, install a 3/4-in. straight bit into the router and adjust it to cut 3/8 in. deep. Slowly push the router along the guide, crossing both plywood pieces. If you plan to use biscuits to attach the face pieces, cut the necessary slots with a biscuit joiner [ 2 ]. For the tall sides, space the slots about 12 to 14 in. apart. Cut three slots into shelves that are 18 in. long or less, and four into longer shelves. (I cut slots for No. 20-size biscuits.)

Your first backsaws should be (1) a dovetail saw, with fine rip teeth, used for cutting joinery along the grain (like dovetails), (2) a “carcass saw” used for cutting across the grain (fine cross cut teeth), and (3) a larger tenon saw used for cutting deeper cuts, like tenon cheeks, along the grain (rip teeth). All three saws are used very, very often in my workshop. You could certainly get by with just a larger dovetail saw and a carcass saw at first, if you don’t plan on immediately cutting large tenons. Buying backsaws can be very confusing because there is no standardized naming system, and a dovetail saw can be turned into a carcass saw (and vice-a-versa) by sharpening it differently. And practically everybody that’s selling antique saws mixes the names up. My buyer’s guide really clears this confusion up and will help you know what to look for.
oh yeah, and buying a bunch of cap nuts is not so easy unless you order ahead of time. i went to two hardware stores (one family owned and one big box) and they kind of laughed at me when i said i needed 32. so i got regular nuts, tightened them so they were flush with the all thread on the front side, hammered it against the board and tightened the back side while holding the front one in place with a wrench. so, some of them have a little bit of overhang on the back side, but i don't have to worry about gouging skin while walking past it. for my next set, i'll order the cap nuts in bulk from ebay ahead of time...
Many beginners trying to get started in woodworking take one look at their budget and worry how they can afford to buy a whole shop full of power tools to get started. Fortunately, one doesn't have to spend a fortune to get started. There are really only seven woodworking tools that I would recommend any beginning woodworker have on hand from the start, and most are relatively inexpensive. However, with these seven tools, a beginner can tackle quite a number of projects.

I learned about the trade from my father starting when I was 6 years old. I took woodshop courses in high school, and was granted the Industrial Arts Award my senior year. I also took some college courses in woodshop before I started my own business when I turned 19.My average work day is laying out jobs, cutting parts, designing the different jobs, and assembling the cabinets. I also am teaching my daughter how to build woodworking projects and cabinet parts, as well as helping with our cutting boards.
My hands-down favorite thing to do is develop the process for manufacturing a new product. This involves figuring out how to design a product so that it’s not only durable and functional, but also economical to build. Then all the jigs, fixtures and CNC programs have to be created and tested until the whole process is running smoothly. Up to now, the most challenging project has been our line of wooden sunglasses which were developed for a specific client. We spent hundreds of hours just figuring out how to build the first pair then hundreds more hours refining the process until they became profitable.
In the sixty years of woodworking I have found two tools of increasing necessity. One is a band saw. I can do most of my work with a band saw and hand plane. The second tool is a bow saw, or actually several bow saws. They will replace the band saw if required, though they are slow. One I made about twenty years ago has a one and a half inch wide rip blade and is about thirty inches long. I think the blade is from an old industrial band saw blade I picked up and sharpened into a rip saw blade. It works very well on ripping lumber, logs, etc. Though it tires me out to much to use it now.
Description: In this 6-session class Angela will be guiding as you carve from a pre-roughed blank. (Check in with the store to see which blanks she will have available for this class.) Angela is an experienced, local carver and has designed this class to be fun and creative. This class is run in 6-session increments and may be repeated as needed as it will usually require multiple classes to complete your project.
On both the belt and disk sanders, the workpiece is presented to the tool (the opposite is true of portable belt and hand-held disk sanders which are presented to the work; as a result, they are particularly useful in sanding oversized workpieces). On stationary sanders, an adjustable worktable or fence can be fixed in front of the sander to position the workpiece during sanding. Belt sizes vary greatly, with four-inch wide, two- or three-foot-long belts being usual, as are four- to eight-inch diameter disks.
Make It: Let your child choose a few bright colors to paint his dragonfly. Paint a wood clothespin to be the body and paint two mini craft sticks to be wings. Once dry, cross the craft sticks on top of the clothespin and glue in place. Add googly eyes to the front and glue a strong magnet to the bottom of the clip. Display it on the fridge and your little one will feel very proud.
Dan, my work space that is available for power tools is quite small, about 6′ x 20′. It may seem like a lot on the surface, but a long rectangle is a bear to work in. It requires a lot of serpentine action. That said, I don’t have too much room for large footprint tools. I have settled finally on three big tools; a small bench saw, a thickness planer, and a drill press. I had to forgo the jointer, so I use hand tools to make up for it’s absence (as I do with a lot of my hand tool techniques). I have gotten to the point where I can flatten one side and true an edge of a board reasonably quick. I then finish it up with the thickness planer and table saw, giving me a nice flat board. I guess what I am basically saying is, there’s more than one way to skin a cat, and don’t write off hand tools as a quaint way to experience the past. They worked for thousands of years, and still do! Thanks for the blogs, they make for great reading.
Thanks for the feedback. We’re glad you found the list helpful. Please note that this page contains only 10 of the 40 top tools for woodworking, displaying only hand tools. You can find the next 10 here: https://www.wagnermeters.com/top-40-woodworking-tools-2/. There are links at the bottom of each article to the next group of tools so you can view the entire list. Hope this helps.
Just a little nitpick on the tape measure blurb. The hook should not be completely tight. It should move in and out about a 1/16th or the thickness of the hook. This way you get an accurate measurement whether you hook a part to measure or bump up to it. If you want more accurate measurements with a tape measure, “burn” an inch instead of hooking or bumping the part. Just line up what you want to measure with the 1″ mark and subtract that inch from the final measurement.
Steely blue walls and a few intricately placed wood slices will give your bathroom a great rustic look. You will need several wood slices to go all the way around the room and then just place them in geometric patterns or however you want. Thin wood slices will affix to the walls easily with wallpaper glue or you can use a hot glue gun if you prefer.
It could be a pun about family life, or a comment on whatever pets have currently made their territory. People love these simple decorations right next to their front doors.With just a board, a little creative painting, and some simple small hooks, you can find yourself around $15 per holder, all for around 30 minutes of sanding, cutting, and painting. 
· Each plan contains a clear and colourful scheme, so no guessing is required. It depends on the level of detail; the most demanding projects will take you to the park! If the instructions are clear, the project is built on its own. All pieces are “clicked” and put in place. It is also suitable for beginners. A skilled woodworker can complete the project in less time than usual ones.
The engineering involved in building this garden bench is pretty simple, and we have provided some links to get a full cut list and plans with photos to help you along the way. Additionally, to the stock lumber, you will need wood screws, barrel locks, and hinges to complete the table. A miter saw or hand saw is also extremely helpful for cutting down your stock to the correct angle and length.
Furnishing and decorating your patio is not an easy task – but then again, it has to be done! Your patio is obviously one of the most important rooms in your home, as you can easily turn it into your little piece of Heaven, your “safe spot” in your home where you can retreat whenever you want to ignore the world and just spend some time alone all by yourself.

Hi, Patrick. “When I get home, if I need to crosscut the 18×8 piece, is that possible on a cabinet saw with a crosscut sled or better with a track saw?” That is possible to do on either a cabinet saw or a track saw, and you can end up with the same result. If I were doing this in my shop I would do it on my table saw because I have one and it would be a quicker setup, but if I didn’t have a table saw I would use a track saw. I have a friend who builds beautiful furniture and cabinetry with a track saw, and he doesn’t feel that it limits what he can build.
thank you, thank you, thank you!! the lumber that i had in the garage wasn't exactly what your plans called for (2x4s and 1x10s), so i adjusted the length of the all thread to accommodate the depth. also, one of my 2x4s was kind of wonky and i was worried it would jeopardize the stability of the set - but it's totally solid! the shelves are level and aren't going anywhere!! :) (i threw all of my body weight against it, and it's totally solid!) it's approx. 4' wide by 7.5' tall.

The jigsaw, another hand held and versatile saw, is used for cutting curves. One has a lot of freedom with a jig saw because it can cut curves, circles and straight. Depending on the width of the blade, the curves can be very fine. The down side to the jigsaw is that straight lines can be difficult depending on the wood you are cutting. No matter, it is important to make sure to always have sharp blades.


Basic function of the furniture is to make our life easier and to make it more beautiful with its appearance. Industrially designed furniture made out of the cheapest materials is the most present on today’s market and it can be found for popular prices, but its quality standards are on the lowest acceptable level (the woodworking joints are not solid and long-lasting, but added just to assemble the furniture simply and quickly; plywood is commonly used instead of wood, etc.). This kind of furniture will surely not last for generations and will rarely withstand even one relocation.

Marc, it’s very difficult to answer this question. Many years ago i started out with a book, and then i got another but i just wasn’t getting it. Then I started watching your video’s and everything came to life. I know there are many options that you would fall under but in my personal opinion there needs to be a Woodwhisperer choice or at least a Pod casting choice =)
There are many textures and materials that can be used for crafting. However, for versatile and affordable crafting, you should think seriously about wood crafts. Craft wood is alluring to crafters first because of its affordable price. When it comes to cheap crafts, wood is the best route. The fact that it is cheap does not mean that it is not useful. In fact, wood crafts are easy to put together, paint and otherwise customize. This means that craft wood has endless possibilities. You can use it in home decor, children's crafts, gifts and much more. For the best selection of wood crafts, you are in the right place. Save on Crafts has crates, boxes, wood burning tools, pine cones and more. Save on Crafts is a discount provider of crafting supplies. This means that you can count on the lowest prices possible with every purchase you make through our store.
Storage can never be enough for a home with children. Especially if the family is midsized to a large one! A headboard with optimum storage space is an ideal solution in children’s room to accommodate most of their belongings, so that they can have an easy access to them on a daily basis, and not litter them everywhere. The headboard can be revamped for them, according to their choice of colors and need. 

Even if you don’t live in a rustic log cabin, you can give your home a great cabin look by simply planking one or more walls. This is a relatively easy project that will add beauty and value to any home. Just choose the wall that you want to change, and add wooden planks which you can pick up at most home improvement stores for very little. Then stain if you want and you have a lovely cabin type wall
Handsaws (often called “panel saws”) are long, thin saws with a comfortable wooden handle. They are used for rough dimensioning of your lumber. Although a “panel saw” is technically a smaller handsaw that fits into the panel of a tool chest, I’ll hereafter refer to this type of saw as a “Panel Saw” to differentiate them from the broad category referred to as “hand saws”. Panel saws come in two tooth configurations: “Rip” (cuts along the grain…like a chisel) and “Cross Cut” (cuts across the grain…like a knife). You will need both.
The wood to be turned is fixed between the “headstock” and “tailstock” of the lathe. The headstock houses the motor that spins the workpiece; the tailstock is adjustable, moving along the length of the bed to fit workpieces of various lengths. Once the piece is locked in place, the tool rest is positioned about an eighth of an inch away from the piece, just below its center line. The spinning workpiece is then shaped using a chisel or gouge held fast to the tool rest. Face-plate turning, in which the workpiece is fastened with screws to the face plate of the drive spindle, enables the woodworker to produce bowls and other hollow goods. 

This plan is probably the easiest plan ever added in the list. The one who is working on this project, don’t need any professional skills but just knowing some basics of woodworking will be enough for this DIY. You will get step by step detailed process of this tutorial in the source linked tutorial. This tutorial will surely help you to build this plan quickly.
You can make your bookshelf any size you’d like, but a standard size with even proportions is about 12 inches deep, 30 inches wide and 48 inches tall. That's big enough to hold books and magazines, but not so big that it won't fit where you want it to. Note: If your shelves are any longer than 32 inches, you'll need thicker lumber or midspan supports so the shelves won't sag when they're filled with books.
It wasn't until the end of the eighteenth century when the first woodworking machine was patented. Some of the basic principles of the earliest woodworking machine tools are still in use today, but the new machines are faster, more powerful, and easier to use than previous generations. We carry a full range of stationary woodworking machines including table saws, miter saws, band saws, drill presses, mortisers, shapers, planers and more. If you have any questions or need help finding what you need, give us a call or email and we'll assist you in finding the right woodworking machine. 
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