Make It: Let your child choose a few bright colors to paint his dragonfly. Paint a wood clothespin to be the body and paint two mini craft sticks to be wings. Once dry, cross the craft sticks on top of the clothespin and glue in place. Add googly eyes to the front and glue a strong magnet to the bottom of the clip. Display it on the fridge and your little one will feel very proud. 

Whatever your dream for a rustic look, you are sure to find something in this collection that will help you along. Many of these projects are so easy to do and you can complete them in less than a day. Some make wonderful gifts as well so if you know someone else who just loves the country, rustic look, make them something to brighten their own décor. The projects use all sorts of materials, many of which are really inexpensive or even cheap in some cases.
Today, in our age of plastic and factories, woodworking has transformed from a common necessary skill into something almost mysterious or awe-inspiring. Because most 21st-century consumers are used to driving to big box stores to pick up another mass-produced replacement when their desk falls apart or their chair breaks, any man today that can walk up to a lumber pile with saw and plane to shape a beautiful and enduring replacement is revered as a “true craftsman.”
Another option is the circular saw mated with a metal guide (known as a track saw ). These systems have quickly come into their own and can deliver exceptional results. They are ideal for both ripping and cross cutting sheets of plywood, but can handle solid stock if it is wide enough. These systems can cost as much as a table saw but they are compact and very portable.
Then, beginning several decades ago, shop classes began to be removed from secondary curriculums. With the decrease in educational funding, and increasing emphasis on standardized testing, schools began to cull electives, institute stricter graduation requirements, and focus more on college prep academics and the subjects necessary for passing state exams. There wasn’t money or time to maintain tools and sawdust-filled workshops, and one by one school districts dropped their shop classes, figuring that students who wished to pursue trade skills could do so later at a vocational college.
Though I’d not planned to strike out on my own, in 2012, it occurred to me I had gained the experience and skills needed to do so and financially, it appeared to be a good time to make it happen. Since I had experience in the field, I chose to remain in the church furniture market but focus more on traditional styles. I’d always admired the old, high altars in European churches and hoped to build some myself. Large scale work does require more than one person, and fortunately, I was able to recruit Austin Glidewell to help establish Altare Design, LLC. By this time I’d mastered conventional woodworking techniques and possessed a working knowledge of marketing, website-building, photography, 3D modeling and business tax laws.
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