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With the advances in modern technology and the demands of industry, woodwork as a field has changed. The development of Computer Numeric Controlled CNC Machines, for example, has made us able to mass-produce and reproduce products, faster, with less waste, and often more complex in design than ever before. CNC Routers can carve complicated and highly detailed shapes into flat stock, to create signs or art. Rechargeable power tools speed up creation of many projects and require much less body strength than in the past, when boring multiple holes, for example. Skilled fine woodworking, however, remains a craft pursued by many. There remains demand for hand crafted work such as furniture and arts, however with rate and cost of production, the cost for consumers is much higher.
Hi, Patrick. “When I get home, if I need to crosscut the 18×8 piece, is that possible on a cabinet saw with a crosscut sled or better with a track saw?” That is possible to do on either a cabinet saw or a track saw, and you can end up with the same result. If I were doing this in my shop I would do it on my table saw because I have one and it would be a quicker setup, but if I didn’t have a table saw I would use a track saw. I have a friend who builds beautiful furniture and cabinetry with a track saw, and he doesn’t feel that it limits what he can build.
You can do this with a dado blade, or alternatively, you can simply make two passes with a standard kerf table saw blade. I often do the “two pass method” for 1/4″ dado and rabbet cuts simply to save time, avoiding setting up a dado blade. Set up a sacrificial fence on your table saw because you will be spinning the blade right next to the fence. Set your blade height to 3/8″, and remove a width of 1/4″.
Whether you really need your privacy or you just want to add a bit of rustic charm to your home, this tree branch privacy screen is a great DIY project. It sort of looks like a bamboo shade and is really easy to make. You just need a few strips of thin wood and as many sticks or branches as you want to add. Hang it wherever you feel you need a bit of extra privacy.

“Basic,” on the other hand, is a word that allows for growth – and that’s exactly what you want in your woodworking tool kit. You want to be able to take the same kit with you through many years in the craft. With my basic woodworking tools list, I wanted to provide a core set of tools that will serve you well from project to project. I’m especially concerned these days with the transition to hardwood furniture making, as opposed to plywood boxes of various sizes. That’s the transition I’m making right now in my own work!
The wood to be turned is fixed between the “headstock” and “tailstock” of the lathe. The headstock houses the motor that spins the workpiece; the tailstock is adjustable, moving along the length of the bed to fit workpieces of various lengths. Once the piece is locked in place, the tool rest is positioned about an eighth of an inch away from the piece, just below its center line. The spinning workpiece is then shaped using a chisel or gouge held fast to the tool rest. Face-plate turning, in which the workpiece is fastened with screws to the face plate of the drive spindle, enables the woodworker to produce bowls and other hollow goods.

Some might expect to see a cordless drill on this list, but when we're talking about basic power woodworking tools, a corded drill is more versatile and powerful. Sure, the cordless is, well, cordless, which makes it more portable, but corded drills are less expensive and can do more than a cordless drill. There are some options to consider when choosing a corded power drill, such as whether you want a 3/8-inch or 1/2-inch chuck, keyed or keyless chuck, straight drill or hammer drill, and so on. Learn all about these options (along with some suggestions on what to look for when shopping) in this article on corded power drills.

Stiles are 2-1/2″ x 72″, the top rail measures 1-1/2″ x 32-3/4″, and the bottom rail is 2-1/2″ x 32-3/4″”. My favorite way to assemble frames is with a pocket hole jig, but you can also choose to use biscuits, or simply use brads to nail individual face frame pieces into place. I sometimes use that approach for large built-ins, where it may be cumbersome to construct a face frame on-site during the installation process. The school that will receive these bookcases requested that the face frame go all the way to the floor to prevent pencils and other items from rolling underneath. I generally prefer to keep the face frame about 2″ from the floor to lighten the appearance, but this is a stylistic choice. On larger pieces, such as armoires, I like to keep them high enough to allow a vacuum cleaner to pass underneath.
Your first backsaws should be (1) a dovetail saw, with fine rip teeth, used for cutting joinery along the grain (like dovetails), (2) a “carcass saw” used for cutting across the grain (fine cross cut teeth), and (3) a larger tenon saw used for cutting deeper cuts, like tenon cheeks, along the grain (rip teeth). All three saws are used very, very often in my workshop. You could certainly get by with just a larger dovetail saw and a carcass saw at first, if you don’t plan on immediately cutting large tenons. Buying backsaws can be very confusing because there is no standardized naming system, and a dovetail saw can be turned into a carcass saw (and vice-a-versa) by sharpening it differently. And practically everybody that’s selling antique saws mixes the names up. My buyer’s guide really clears this confusion up and will help you know what to look for.
You should also double-check the length of your all-thread rods. I'd dummy one up and try it out before cutting all of them. It needs to be just long enough to catch a couple of threads and snug down without punching out through the cap nut. The actual "cap" portion of cap nuts is fairly thin, and if the all-thread is even a bit too long it will punch through the end when you snug it up.
Use 1x12 pine lumber for a rustic appearance. Nothing looks like pine with its large knots and swirls. And because you're using solid lumber, you can sand the edges smooth for a finished appearance. Add a 1/4-inch fir plywood back for strength and stability. Note that "1x12" is a nominal size. The actual size will be ¾-inch thick and 11 ¼-inches wide.
Mallet. A mallet is a wooden hammer. If you're going to use a chisel you have to use it with a mallet. Using a regular hammer is a big no. Wooden projects such as furniture almost always require tapping to put things in place or to make them stronger. Using a regular hammer will most likely cause damage. Mallets are your only option. Get them is a few different sizes so they suit all your projects big and small.
Upon graduating from high school, I wasn’t sure exactly what career to pursue, but I knew it had to be something that involved creating things with my hands. I’d always had natural talent working with tools, and despite having been an A-average student, I was never fond of conventional academics. Not having better plans at the time, I took one calculus course, got an “A”, then promptly decided two things: I didn’t enjoy college and taking on any debt would force me into a dull, conventional 9-5 job until the debt could be paid off. I didn’t know this back then, but I was pretty much a textbook case of the restless student with the entrepreneurial spirit. Just a few months later, I got the opportunity to accept an apprenticeship at Remmert Studios which was an incredible break. It was a result of reading a local newspaper article about the business, then going to meet the owner. Not many are able to break into woodworking that easily, especially in the high-end market. That company did a lot of contemporary furniture for churches, and being short-staffed, it wasn’t long before I was given a full-time position.While working that job, I was also taking week-long classes at Marc Adams School of Woodworking as time and money permitted. The combination of hands-on work and classroom study allowed me to acquire new skills very quickly. Being at the school also netted an internship opportunity with one of North America’s most prestigious furniture-makers, Michael Fortune.
Build a model boat. Model boats are a bit tricky to shape and it's best to find individual patterns for these, depending on the type of boat you're after. A very basic one can be made from a rectangular block of wood with a dowel hole drilled in the center, a dowel inserted for the sail pole and a sail (cloth or paper) attached to the dowel pole. It's not the most elegant but it's quick and simple, and from there, you can start building more advanced versions.
I’ve got a three other bits of advice: First of all, get really, really good at woodworking. There are lots of people who enjoy it as a hobby. To sell your services, you’ve got to be able to do far superior work or do it much faster than everyone else (preferably both). Failure to do so means competing against hundreds of amateurs who make things for the pleasure of it, then sell their work at cost to fund the hobby. Second, develop great people skills. Most professionals do custom work and few focus on selling a product. Most of them sell a service, and a big part of that is getting customers to enjoy the experience of collaborating with a woodworker to create their dream products. If your customers don’t like you, they can usually save time and money by getting something from an online catalog. People who buy handcrafted items from woodworkers are often attracted to the idea of supporting artisans. The face behind the work is important to them. Last, develop an iron-clad work ethic. In this field you’re directly trading time for money, and that time is very limited. It’s important to be productive, so try to get 40 hours of actual productivity (as in making things) every week. Accounting, phone conversations and social media marketing may be important, but none of them provide an actual paycheck, so they don’t count as productive work.
It’s a unique environment to learn in, and a great neighborhood to visit with a spouse or entire family. Just a quarter mile from the beginning of Tampa’s Riverwalk, you’re steps away from Tampa’s museums, parks and some of the hippest spots to eat and drink. In fact, the School of Woodwork partners with a craft beer business just around the corner.
Start by building a base out of 1x or 2x lumber. Make its depth 1 1/2 to 2 in. less than the depth of the bookcase itself. Its height must be 1/8 in. taller than the baseboard molding you plan to install to make sure the molding slips in easily. Set the base into position and check for level right to left and front to back. Fasten it to the wall studs using 3-in. drywall screws [ 1 ]. Also drive angled screws through the inside of the base and into the floor.
So what is the definition of a traditional woodworker? Is it someone who builds furniture only by candle light and scoffs at the use of modern power woodworking tools? To me, traditional woodworking is about using traditional joinery, finishes, and methods  to create beautiful and quality furniture that will last many lifetimes. Yes, here at Wood And Shop we focus mostly on using woodworking hand tools, but in my opinion, quality traditional style furniture can also be built using woodworking power tools. I personally love using woodworking hand tools, but I incorporate a mixture of  woodworking hand tools and woodworking power tools to balance personal enjoyment with productivity. But whichever balance you decide to strike between power tools and hand tools, I strongly encourage you to learn the fundamentals of hand tool woodworking so that you can better understand traditional furniture making. And you’ll also discover that some woodworking tasks are actually faster with woodworking hand tools!
In this age of air-powered nailers, drills, sanders, impact wrenches, grinders, saws, spray guns, washers, and other pneumatic tools, the compressor has become a virtual necessity. The compressor consists of a motorized pump; a tank for storing the compressed air; an on/off control (governor) that tells the pump when to start and stop in order to keep the pressure within preset limits; and a regulator to control the pressure at which the air escapes the tank to suit the needs of the tools being used. There’s a metal frame on which all the parts are mounted, usually with a carrying handle and sometimes wheels. 

Next, grab a role of tape to make your rounded corners for the arms and back supports. Do a rounded corner for the two outside armrests, and for both outside pieces of the table top. Create rounded corners for the top of the backrest supports as well(Part H). Cut with a jigsaw and use an orbital sander to smooth the edges. Check out photos in later parts of the project to see the rounded edges.
Always be on the lookout for usable wood. You might be able to salvage some. You can use a metal detector to find nails and screws. You don’t need a full fledged metal detector. I use a pinpointer made by Garrett. If your wood has some woodboring beetles you can still use it if not eaten too badly. A healthy dose of cyfluthrin will take care of them.
gregoryterry06111969@gmail.com Thanks for the pep talk. I’ve been kinda stale on my creative thinking lately. A few years back i made a birdhouse for a gal friend of mine,except the birdhouse wasn’t for birds it was to hide or disguise a security camera for her small motel she owns. She loved it and i enjoyed making it although i spent too much time with intricate details. My first attempt on the first piece i cut was unsatisfactory to me so i discarded that piece and continued with the project. After it was completed and she loved it so much she paid me 125$ for it. Well longer story shortened I get bored easily and one day sometime later I was looking at that first piece I had discarded and it inspired me to create something i call the ” Perpetual Puzzle”. Turns out everybody I’ve shown it to absolutely loves it and say that they would definitely pay good money for one. My problem is I don’t know the first thing about marketing or patents, copyrights and so forth. Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

The router is a hand held tool which is often mounted upside down and is used to hollow out an area in the face of a work piece. It is also used to cut profiles for moldings and adding decorative edges to any piece enhances its beauty and dimension. Routers are also used to cut joinery, such as dovetails and dados. The beauty of a router is that one can purchase an unlimited number of profiles to best suit the many requirements which arise with woodworking.
At the same time, in order to improve your skills, you have to first use those skills and will make mistakes as a novice. How quickly those are overcome and improved on varies from person to person. Some craftsmen grasp a skill quickly and progress to higher levels, others, for several reasons, take more time. Those that do this quickly thrive as self-taught artisans.
Today, in our age of plastic and factories, woodworking has transformed from a common necessary skill into something almost mysterious or awe-inspiring. Because most 21st-century consumers are used to driving to big box stores to pick up another mass-produced replacement when their desk falls apart or their chair breaks, any man today that can walk up to a lumber pile with saw and plane to shape a beautiful and enduring replacement is revered as a “true craftsman.”
While some people consider the circular saw to be more of a carpentry tool than a fine woodworking tool, but some would disagree. There may be no more versatile basic handheld power tool than a circular saw. When used with a clamp-on straight-edge, the circular saw can be just about as accurate as a table saw and handle quite a few of the tasks that one would attempt with a table saw, particularly cutting sheet goods such as plywood or medium-density fiberboard. When woodworking on a budget, a quality circular saw should be the first handheld power tool purchased, as it is the one that will likely be the most useful as you get started.
This bookcase plan is designed to be large enough to handle all of the books belonging to the voracious reader in your family, virtually indestructible to withstand years of abuse, and easy on the pocket book using inexpensive materials from your local home center. For about $100 you can have a bookcase that would cost $600 – $800 at a retail furniture store.
So my partners and I opened a Woodcraft store that had an established school as a main part of its business plan. What could be better? Come for a class and buy some tools. But when I first presented the idea of a full-fledged school to the corporate people and told them the dollar amount that I planned to do in school tuition sales, they basically laughed at me. A year after we were opened, they finally started to take notice of this whole "education thing" because I had not only met my projections, I doubled them.
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The best advice I could give you is to learn WordPress or find a friend who can help you figure it out. Once the light bulb goes off there will be no stopping you, you will have the power in your own hands to provide what your end user needs and to educate them about the benefits and your products value – in a selfish, wasteful, throw-away society who expect everything delivered yesterday and expect to pay dirt cheap prices for your skills and repetitive hard work. End of rant….Sorry but I just had to comment. I know what it’s like, don’t lose hope!
Start by arranging all the parts on your work surface. Justin used a flux brush to spread the glue in the slots, and onto the biscuits after they were installed. Any small brush will work, though. When you have everything assembled, install clamps to hold the sides tight to the shelves while the glue dries. Check by using a framing square or by measuring diagonally from opposite corners to make sure the bookcase is square. Adjust it if needed. Then tighten the clamps. This is a good time to take a break while you let the glue dry for about an hour.
In order to be successful in woodworking, there are skills absolutely necessary to know and master.  Many of these skills were once taught in high school’s all across the nation, but today, most woodshop classes have been suspended, and people must learn through college classes, apprenticeships, internships, from professionals, or by trial and error. 
One of my mentors started out as a cabinetmaker who loved working wood but dreaded getting to the finishing part. He started doing some digging to learn more about it and became so addicted to the process that nowadays he loathes having to build anything because all he wants to do is the finishing! I promise that if you give a little energy to learning how to properly finish your work, your enjoyment of the finished piece will be dramatically increased. These final touches are enough to inspire you to take on another project.
If you`ve found the diy bookshelf plans  below interesting we invite you to check various other free woodworking plans, we have curated lists that will show you how to build a router table, duck house, deer stand, bat house, tiny house, rocket stove, diy tree house, cat tower, garage, fire pit, porch swing, greenhouse, small cabin, farmhouse table, pole barn, rabbit hutch, diy dog bed, a playhouse, a chicken coop, a coffee table or a gazebo.
Then, beginning several decades ago, shop classes began to be removed from secondary curriculums. With the decrease in educational funding, and increasing emphasis on standardized testing, schools began to cull electives, institute stricter graduation requirements, and focus more on college prep academics and the subjects necessary for passing state exams. There wasn’t money or time to maintain tools and sawdust-filled workshops, and one by one school districts dropped their shop classes, figuring that students who wished to pursue trade skills could do so later at a vocational college.
As far as shelves go, they’re not too efficient at holding much (six pieces of wood with the only piece used for storage), but they look quite pretty and are quite easy to make. You can usually charge double for these shelves compared to the traditional floating shelves, and with a little customizable paint option, you can dominate the contemporary scene with these neat looking shelves.
Eventually, I got engaged and my whole world started to change as I started planning my wedding. I became obsessed with the fun, creative part of planning a wedding. Once my wedding was over, I missed making things for it and I really felt like something was missing and was drawn to the idea of starting a creative business.  I ended up discovering vintage rental companies and I was immediately drawn to this business concept because you spent time curating and creating a collection of beautiful, one of a kind furniture and décor pieces for brides to rent out. But, what I was most drawn to was this up and coming concept of farm table rentals for weddings (this was back in 2013).
So what is it about starting a woodworking school? It seems that every time I open a woodworking magazine, there is yet another ad for a new woodworking school - usually run by a furniture maker. They're probably thinking, "It can't be that hard, right? I know how to make furniture, I have some tools and I can keep doing my own furniture. But I can attract students and teach them anything they want to know at the same time?"
I’ve got a three other bits of advice: First of all, get really, really good at woodworking. There are lots of people who enjoy it as a hobby. To sell your services, you’ve got to be able to do far superior work or do it much faster than everyone else (preferably both). Failure to do so means competing against hundreds of amateurs who make things for the pleasure of it, then sell their work at cost to fund the hobby. Second, develop great people skills. Most professionals do custom work and few focus on selling a product. Most of them sell a service, and a big part of that is getting customers to enjoy the experience of collaborating with a woodworker to create their dream products. If your customers don’t like you, they can usually save time and money by getting something from an online catalog. People who buy handcrafted items from woodworkers are often attracted to the idea of supporting artisans. The face behind the work is important to them. Last, develop an iron-clad work ethic. In this field you’re directly trading time for money, and that time is very limited. It’s important to be productive, so try to get 40 hours of actual productivity (as in making things) every week. Accounting, phone conversations and social media marketing may be important, but none of them provide an actual paycheck, so they don’t count as productive work.
I make grape vine baskets and trees and other things but in this area peopl cant pay what they are worth so i have to sell them cheap im not getting anywhere fast they sell as fast as i can make them shops buy them and doubl and tripl prices im about to call it a day its to much work for sombody to make all the money i just dont live in the. Rite area is ther a answer to this im just a getting old country boy
Whether you really need your privacy or you just want to add a bit of rustic charm to your home, this tree branch privacy screen is a great DIY project. It sort of looks like a bamboo shade and is really easy to make. You just need a few strips of thin wood and as many sticks or branches as you want to add. Hang it wherever you feel you need a bit of extra privacy.

My own organization is crucial to the success of a class, especially with an advanced project class. If I have not examined each operation we need to do, in what order we will do it in and, most importantly, how many operations we can do simultaneously, then we will get very little done and the project will not even be close to finished in the time allotted.
For cross-cut work, position the board flush with the fence at the rear of saw and draw the blade across the wood. The bevel lock allows the saw to be tilted for cutting angles; set it to the desired angle using the protractor on the saw housing. The saw can be swivelled right or left for mitering, or even turned a full 90 degrees for ripping. The blade can also be raised or lowered using a crank. The size of the saw is determined by the dimension of the blade the saw can accommodate. Many models use 10-inch blades, which will cut stock up to 3 inches thick.
This might be where the fist-to-cuffs start. Why a router table as my second choice? It’s so versatile. With the right fence set up, I can edge joint boards, like I could on a jointer. (No, you can’t face joint, but I’ll live with that for now.) I can make any number of joints, create doors, and profile edges. I can remove the router and use it hand-held for work at my bench. A good router table simply provides lots of bang for the buck.

I consider this my “basic” tool list. Although I do not have a dedicated box for these tools, I assure you that they have a great home in cabinets, on shelves, and laying around on benches. When I do need to take my hand tools somewhere, the larger tools end up in a simple tongue and grooved latch box my grandfather owned. The smaller tools are always in my overall pockets. Overalls work great. They have multiple pockets, they’re comfortable, and they protect your upper body and legs. You only have to deal with small chunks of wood getting into the pockets, which can be dealt with if you or your other half are crafty enough to sew some flaps. It doesn’t bother me though. Thanks for your time.
And with many homes falling into the “contemporary but traditional’ style that has taken over the decade, these wine racks are in high demand and can fetch a pretty penny for even a more simplistic design.Feel free to get creative with the design for some more bargaining power. And for a design to hold a small number of bottles, you can expect up to $50 per unit sold.
here's my 6x6 version build with #2 pine. shelves are 1x10 and threaded rod upsized to 5/16" to allow for extra width. center upright spaced at 1/3 side to side. this is very complex structurally - all the commenters who don't believe it should build it to really feel how it works. it is basically like a post-tensioned high rise. i think i'd like to paint the uprights and stain the shelves.

Despite the popularity of plastics, MDF (medium density fiberboard) and other materials, wood is still the product of choice for most people when it comes to the expectation of quality, value, and utility.  Today, many wood products, such as musical instruments and furniture are mass-produced, but trained woodworkers make custom-made products with their hands and their tools based on drawings and architectural designs.


If you have wood pallets just lying around the yard, put them to use by turning them into a great mud room bench. This bench would look fabulous on the deck or just inside the door, wherever you want to put it. When you finish putting it all together, just sand and stain it whatever color you want and you have a beautiful bench that cost you very little to create.
A super simple iPad Dock/stand made out of a single block of wood features an angled groove which gets to support the tablet device and a cut in a hole to revise access to the home button of your iPad. It’s possible to drill an access channel in the stand through which you can run a charging cable, although this mini stripped back iPad stand may have very limited functions.
This bookcase lets you have plenty of storage for your books, without you having to show it openly. With a locking system, light mechanisms and a lot of built in shelves, this design form maybe the most high tech of all the others we have discussed. Many interesting features such as a folding door, leading to another area of the house, which a guest may never know- completely steal the show!
You’ll need a long screwdriver with a square blade that is very heavy duty. This gives you a lot of torque. You’ll also need a small and medium slot screwdriver. For working on cabinets or tight places in woodworking, you’ll need a screwdriver with a thin shank so that you can reach screws that are inside of deep holes. This is accomplished with a cabinet screwdriver. Get a couple of medium Phillips head screwdrivers, and a stubby one too, for those tight places. You may also want a ratcheting screwdriver.
here's my 6x6 version build with #2 pine. shelves are 1x10 and threaded rod upsized to 5/16" to allow for extra width. center upright spaced at 1/3 side to side. this is very complex structurally - all the commenters who don't believe it should build it to really feel how it works. it is basically like a post-tensioned high rise. i think i'd like to paint the uprights and stain the shelves.
If you enjoy these free bookcase plans be sure to check out these other free woodworking plans for shelves, coffee tables, entertainment centers, desks, Little Free Library, wine racks, jewelry boxes, home bars, kitchen islands, bathroom vanities, playhouses, picnic tables, dog houses, decks, workbenches, tree houses, pergolas, sheds, Adirondack chairs, bunk beds, and even chicken coops.
Thank you for sharing your story! Would love to hear how you got started with your blog and business too someday, I always find it so interesting what inspires people to shift their career path. I can’t believe you’ve learned so much with YouTube videos! And congrats on creating such a successful business from scratch and also having the courage to walk away when you knew it wasn’t for you anymore. We’re having a home built next year, so look forward to checking out all the custom work you’ve done with your place!

One great aspect of Teds Woodworking is that it is easy to understand! You will find all the projects and a way to learn how to build them with an easy step by step procedure. These plans and structures are already proven to work. Some guides out there will only give you lousy plans and waste your time. Teds Woodworking offers simple guides and schematics. This system has blueprints for almost everything you want to make. There are available blueprints from dog houses to green houses. Even instructions for building gazebos and guitars are easy to follow. The instructions on how to create children’s and baby cradles are carefully laid out in a way that you can easily build them right away.
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To give you an idea about the different bookshelf plans available,this guide presents you 17 simple but alluring bookcase designs to choose from. The designs are not only in a wide array of sizes and styles but they are also inexpensive to build and will fulfil your home space. So be sure to go through all of them to find the best one for your room.
Nearly every woodworking project in one form or another will require you to check some intersection, joint, or board end for squareness, or "square." In some cases, you'll need to confirm that an entire assembly is square. For small projects, you can use a squaring tool, such as a try square, speed square, or framing square. For larger projects, you can check for square by measuring diagonally between opposing corners: The assembly is square when the measurements are equal. You can also use the 3-4-5 method, based on the Pythagorean Theorem: a2 + b2 = c2.
To minimize potential cupping, we decided to make the top by gluing two pieces of 1×6 together rather than using a solid board. Choose a straight piece of 1×6 with a sharp, clean edge. Cut the pieces long and trim the top to length after you glue the two parts together. For pro tips on gluing boards edge-to-edge, see “Edge Gluing Boards” . Justin and Jackson cut biscuit slots in the sides of the two 1x6s to help hold them in alignment while installing the clamps. Glue and clamp the two 1x6s. Then let the glue set up about 30 minutes before routing the edge (Photo 10).

Disclaimer: I've definitely taken a route that favors hand tools. More so than say, the 'modern' approach -- and it's mostly because, having used both awesome power tools, and awesome hand tools, I find that I enjoy the process of the work more with hand tools (I can actually chat with someone while I'm using hand tools -- not so much when I'm running a circular saw, router, sander, band saw, table saw, etc.)   So, my take is going to be biased towards a more 'traditional' approach -- but the resources and people listed below are no strangers to modern tools either, and definitely make use of them when they choose.


This is that rare two-for-one deal in which two tools have been effectively made one. The stationary belt sander uses a closed loop of paper that travels at speed around a pair of cylindrical drums. One drum is driven by an electric motor, the other is spring-loaded to maintain belt tension. Powered by the same motor, the stationary disk sander uses sanding disks that spin on a backing plate.
Dust Collector. A dust collector works at the source of creation. It’s main purpose is to collect the dust right from the place you are cutting the wood. A lot of power tools come with a dust collector extension which allows the dust collector to be attached to them directly. This means a lot less cleaning up for you to do. Dust collectors come in two types, single bag and double bag. Single bag ones are more common.
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