Building a bookcase or bookshelf is a fairly simple woodworking plan that you can get done in just a day or two. This is also a low-cost project as well and since the project idea is free, you don't have to worry about busting through your budget. Just follow the simple steps in the tutorial and enjoy your own company building a simple bookcase on this weekend.

8.  Making the furniture requires a greater precision of the manufacture than the most other crafts, and so the special attention should be given to measuring and marking. Any incorrectly cut part will result in assembling problems and it will reduce compactness of the whole assemblage. If you make a mistake in cutting on a visible place, it will ruin the aesthetics of the entire piece of furniture or you will have to throw that part away and make it again.
Description: You've seen him demo in the store, now come join Rod Hendrickson to learn to carve your own realistic animals. Beginners and carvers of all levels are welcome to join this on-going class. First time students will make a miniature duck decoy. Tuition is for 12 hours of class time. Rough cut outs are supplied by the instructor - check with Rod for cost. (approximately $15 for the miniature duck decoy blank)
Screwdrivers are another must-have in the woodworker’s set of hand tools. Not only will you need Phillips and slot, or flathead screwdrivers, you’ll need star drivers and Torx drivers, too. A quality construction is vital to a good set of screwdrivers. So many of them are made out of soft metal, and the first time you put any “oomph” behind them, they strip out, becoming absolutely useless.
Just for the record, a jointer and planer are not from the ICDT kit – the philosophy on that column is, indeed, beginner AND basic (hence the Workmate). The tools we suggest in the ICDT manual are for those who are working at a kitchen table or in a backyard; the tools the editors would recommend for someone who is quite sure he or she wants to pursue serious furniture making would be rather different.

At some point dust collection needs to be considered. For safety reasons all power tools should run in conjunction with a good dust collection system. However the reality is that many woodworkers will put up with the dust for a while, if not forever. There are machines that really can't be run without dust collection such as a large planer or a bandsaw. The chips and sawdust must be extracted or else the buildup will damage the machine. A large shop vac may be sufficient for smaller machines, and portable dust collectors are available that can be moved from one machine to another. Dust collection is a reasonable investment that should actually be made early on. Your health is well worth the cost.
In the sixty years of woodworking I have found two tools of increasing necessity. One is a band saw. I can do most of my work with a band saw and hand plane. The second tool is a bow saw, or actually several bow saws. They will replace the band saw if required, though they are slow. One I made about twenty years ago has a one and a half inch wide rip blade and is about thirty inches long. I think the blade is from an old industrial band saw blade I picked up and sharpened into a rip saw blade. It works very well on ripping lumber, logs, etc. Though it tires me out to much to use it now.
1. The choice of wood: The choice of wood depends largely on the purpose which it is to be used and personal taste. We will recommend the type of wood in most cases, but since there are many wood types that fully satisfy the set quality standards for each piece of furniture, the final selection of wood type will depend on your taste, the accessibility on the market and the price. In the furniture manufacture you can use both hardwood and softwood, but if you want your piece of furniture to last for generations, we recommend a good quality hardwood. The quality of wood is one of the most important things that have to be considered when making furniture. A numerous wood types are being used for the furniture manufacture. Traditionally, the most frequently used is a good quality local hardwood, so – depending on which part of the world you are living in – you can usually found the furniture made out of maple, figured maple, cypress, redwood, walnut, cherry, mahogany, oak, birch (yellow, red, flame birch), beech, alder, aspen, elm, hickory, teak, pine and many other wood types. In the past, when demand for the furniture was not so big as it is today and when the furniture was made to last for generations, only the most hard and durable woods were used. Today, when the furniture is no longer made to last for a hundred years, it is often made out of the less durable woods, which are less expensive, and can endure for a long period with good care and maintenance in modern living conditions. Choose good quality and well dried wood with grain and color characteristics that you like, get to know its treatment characteristics and features and you will fulfill the first condition to own a beautiful piece of furniture.
Woodworking knowledge is something we are all constantly in pursuit of. Thankfully, there are a LOT of options available to us. We no longer have to rely on taking expensive classes when so much information can be found online and in books. And as many Guild members know, even online classes can be quite effective thanks to the additional interactivity. In my situation, most of my learning is through podcasts, books, and blogs. I punctuate my learning each year by taking a class or two. And whenever possible, I do try to learn directly from other woodworkers in person. So if you’re like me, you probably want to select more than one thing in this list. Let’s just say you should pick the one that you get the MOST information from. And if you are thinking about podcasts, just select the Woodworking Blogs option, since most podcasts are presented on blogs.
Offer good for one item at regular price only. Limit one coupon per customer per day. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Offer is not valid with any other coupon, discount or previous purchase. One cut or one bolt of fabric or trim "by the yard" equals one item. Online fabric & trim discount is limited to 10 yards, single cut. Excludes CRICUT® products, candy & snack products, gum & mints, gift cards, custom orders, labor, rentals, class fees or items labeled "Your Price". Exclusions subject to change. Cash Value 1/10¢.
I am finally getting to practice my woodworking more after years of collecting tools. By using tool reviews and thinking of the kind of work I would like to do, I have accumulated a nice set of tools without purchasing many mistakes. I decided to use Paul Sellers book and videos and start learning from the beginning. He starts with projects that begin with a small set of tools. One of those tools is a spokeshave. Even though I know much of what is in the first lessons, I have picked up a few new tricks, and am learning to use my tools more efficiently. My most important tools are my workbench and vise. The workbench was tough to build as I was on the floor using hand planes; not a good way to work. I have no jointer; did get a small planer and made a sled for it so I can flatten a board. My tools are in my house, so there is no room for a big table saw or bandsaw. I have a chopsaw and a piece of an old Craftsman tablesaw I got for free. It has to be moved outside to use. A circular saw with a guide is handy. My guide has a plate on which the saw is mounted. The plate slides on aluminum angle (with help of rollers) which is screwed to plywood. Once the initial cut is made in the plywood, the plywood is simply lined up with your cut marks and clamped down.
I agree with your list. My table (cabinet) saw has a router mount built into the table to the right of the blade and it works great. The table is flat cast iron and I can use the table saw fence. I’ve also built an auxiliary fence with dust collection and more features. The only downside is I can’t use a router lift and have to make depth adjustments under the table. To avoid frequent band saw blade changes, I have two: a big one (17″, 2HP, 12″ thick capacity) for typical work and a 9″ bench-top unit that I keep a narrow blade in. I also build radio control airplanes and the small one works great on small stock.
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Every woodworker needs a couple of levels. You probably won’t need one of the 6-foot levels used in construction, but 48” is a good length for many of the woodworking projects you’ll do. Usually, you’ll also need an 8” level too, usually known as a torpedo level. You’ll check the level and plum of your construction. Level means horizontal, and plumb is vertical.

The wood to be turned is fixed between the “headstock” and “tailstock” of the lathe. The headstock houses the motor that spins the workpiece; the tailstock is adjustable, moving along the length of the bed to fit workpieces of various lengths. Once the piece is locked in place, the tool rest is positioned about an eighth of an inch away from the piece, just below its center line. The spinning workpiece is then shaped using a chisel or gouge held fast to the tool rest. Face-plate turning, in which the workpiece is fastened with screws to the face plate of the drive spindle, enables the woodworker to produce bowls and other hollow goods.
Dust Collector. A dust collector works at the source of creation. It’s main purpose is to collect the dust right from the place you are cutting the wood. A lot of power tools come with a dust collector extension which allows the dust collector to be attached to them directly. This means a lot less cleaning up for you to do. Dust collectors come in two types, single bag and double bag. Single bag ones are more common.
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